Hiking in Breckenridge: Debunking the Top Myths 

myths about hiking

Summertime hiking in Breckenridge is a great way to develop a warm relationship with the mountain ranges. Some may think that you have to have impressive skills to tackle the trails in the region. However, there is no requirement for specialized gear, advanced skills, or a geo-locator. There is a trail for every age group and fitness level in the vicinity. 

This post will dispel some common misconceptions about hiking in Breckenridge to ensure that you can fully enjoy the wonders the region has to offer. 

Myth 1. Hiking Boots are a Requirement for a Hike

Forgot to bring your hiking boots? No cause for concern as only steep, challenging trails require hiking boots. Breckenridge’s busiest walkways, the Blue River recreation trail in downtown Breckenridge, can be your preferred choice for casual strolling and stunning vistas. You can explore this paved trail in standard outdoor footwear while admiring local wildflowers and picturesque vistas of the famous Ten Mile Range.

But the majority of paths require the right footwear. In several of Breckenridge’s intermediate or basic paths, colorful joggers and sneakers take the place of hiking boots. Good hiking gear with support and stability and Vibram soles are required for the 5-8 hour climb up a Fourteener’s rugged terrain. 

However, most of Breckenridge’s trails are not particularly difficult. That said, if you have access to quality hiking footwear and gear you can always use them to ensure additional comfort and stability during your trek.

proper footwear for hiking

For your hiking trip, there are other equipment options to think about besides the right footwear. Consider how long you intend to travel, how remote the area is, and what the weather requires before you set off. No matter the season, don’t overlook these hiking basics:

  • Wearing layers and bring a raincoat
  • Sunglasses, a hat, and sunscreen
  • Snacks and a reusable water bottle

Visit the Breckenridge Welcome Center for information on trails, maps, equipment, and appropriate footwear if you’re unsure of where to go. If you don’t already have all you need, outdoor shops throughout the city can assist you with renting, purchasing, and finding the appropriate equipment for your hiking and apparel necessities.

Myth 2. All the Trails are Rocky and Steep

Most trails are simple and ideal for taking a stroll. As is the premise of being in the Rocky Mountains, every path in the Breckenridge area ascends at a certain juncture. However, not all trails are rocky and abrasive. 

Around Breckenridge, there are many trails for hikers of every skill level. The Blue River Trail’s gradual meander and the B&B Trail’s historical trek are excellent places to start acclimating your legs and lungs to the elevation. 

Consider Bakers Tank Trail from the entrance at Boreas Pass, or the slow ascent up Iowa Hill, which adds elevation over a mile of switchbacks. A chair lift ride up the mountain will take you to the guided hiking paths at the Breckenridge Ski Resort if heading downhill sounds more your pace.

staying on hiking trails

Myth 3. One Can Get Lost Easily 

The majority of Breckenridge trails are labeled. While it’s possible to go lost, it’s also simple to avoid doing so. Staying on the trail is among the best strategies to avoid getting lost and refrain from taking shortcuts. The Breckenridge Welcome Center and local shops sell the map of the nearby trails. Visit Colorado Trails Explorer for a comprehensive trail guide.

Myth 4. Trails Loop

Almost all of the time, there will be only a single route to go since the Town of Breckenridge is situated at the confluence of the stunning Blue River at an elevation of 9,600 feet. This also holds true for a large number of the trails in the Breckenridge region, where a huge network of trails was left behind from the era of the gold rush.

A hike that is an out-and-back is not inherently bad. Your sights are vastly different even though you followed the same route. On the way down for instance, if you were gazing east when you ascended, you will now be gazing west.

Even so, there are numerous loop trail alternatives in the Breckenridge region. You can design your circuits, such as the well-known B&B Trail to Minnie Mine, using the trail networks in French Gulch east of downtown or Gold Run Gulch next to the Breckenridge Golf Course. 

hiking safety

Myth 5. Beware of the Wildlife

Nature is what renders Breckenridge so unique. You might see creatures like mountain goats, foxes, and various birds while you’re in Breckenridge. Usually, most wild creatures are safe when left alone. So don’t worry too much about foxes, mountain lions, and bears. They are quite uncommon to see, and you shouldn’t expect them to want to interact with you. 

The only creatures in Breckenridge that you need to be more aware of are moose and coyotes. Despite giving the impression of being calm, moose are territorial, especially if they’re with their offspring. The best course of action if you come across a moose is to leave as soon as you can as all they want is to be left alone.

You can take some time before a hike to familiarize yourself with the trail’s safety guides for maximized comfort and security during your trek.

Closing Thoughts 

There you have it, some common myths about hiking in the area. Always remember to travel responsibly and follow the Care for Colorado guidelines while you’re here.

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